This information is transferred ("scrobbled") to Last.fm's database either via the music player itself (including, among others Spotify, Deezer, Tidal, and Music Bee) or via a plug-in installed into the user's music player.

The "love" and "ban" buttons allowed users to gradually customise their profiles.

won the Europrix 2002 and was nominated for the Prix Ars Electronica in 2003.

was founded in 2002 by Felix Miller, Martin Stiksel, Michael Breidenbruecker and Thomas Willomitzer, all of them from Germany or Austria, as an internet radio station and music community site, using similar music profiles to generate dynamic playlists.

The site name takes advantage of a domain hack using .fm, the top level domain of Micronesia, popular with FM radio related sites.

This provoked a large negative reaction from some of the user community who perceive the removal as hindering the ability of lesser-known and unsigned artists to gain exposure for their music and general enjoyment of the site.

The change meant that a tag radio stream would include all music tagged as such, not just that tagged by each individual user, effectively widening the number of tracks that might be streamed under any one tag set.

The programming, which consisted mostly of music aggregated by Last.fm's user-generated weekly music charts as well as live performances and interviews from the studios in New York City debuted on 5 October.

On 12 April 2010, announced that they would be removing the option to preview entire tracks, instead redirecting to sites such as the free Hype Machine and pay-to-listen MOG for this purpose.

The Audioscrobbler and teams began to work closely together, both teams moving into the same offices in Whitechapel, London, and by 2003 was fully integrated with Audioscrobbler profiles.

Input could come through an Audioscrobbler plugin or a station.

In all other countries, listening to Radio will soon require a subscription of €3.00 per month." The change went into effect on 22 April 2009.