Once you understand what's driving that feeling in your gut, you can tackle it head on.

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So what should you do if you get this feedback at work from your peers or superiors? “Our brain tends to reject or dislike people or something that is too perfect or demands perfection from us. The Pratfall Effect happens when a person makes a mistake and, in doing so, becomes more likable.

Here are five steps to reforming your unapproachable image and getting back on track. Admitting that you are not perfect and need help understanding how people perceive you can give you the Pratfall Effect.” In other words, you can start combating the perception that you’re intimidating by admitting a small amount of fault and asking people to explain how your behavior affects them.

“Being open and authentic to others, and giving them a reason for your actions not only humanizes you but also increases your likeability,” says Flores.

She also points out that self-awareness is critical to personal growth, so knowing exactly which of your actions is making others uncomfortable will be worth it in the long run..

We compare ourselves to others all the time because we get a feeling of safety and security when we know we're just as good as--if not better than--someone else.

In this context, intimidation is essentially just the feeling that somebody's able to outdo us.“This is about having more informal bonds and allowing them to see a different side of you.” The more personable you are with others, the harder it is for them to be nervous around you. Colene recommends being clear that you don’t intend to be intimidating, signaling that you’re open to working on the problem, and actively requesting more information.“Get to know them on a more personal level and that fear will start to go away. Ask questions like: “Was it what I said, or how I said it? ” Colene notes that you need to “be really open and set goals to make specific behavioral changes.“This is potentially a problem not only because it repels others, but also because it doesn’t give them the opportunity to contribute and feel valued.” It’s true that if one person is dominating a team, the other members will become less invested, feeling as if their contributions don’t matter or won’t be acknowledged.“What is critical,” says Traeger, “is that others have the opportunity to struggle, learn and grow.”.It's not, however, something you have to suffer by default.