But now that I'm older and I'd like to think wiser, I've seen the error of my ways.While doing a good job might seem like the best way around a ruthlessly demanding boss, often times a stand-up performance won't do it.While it's never pleasant being come down on hard, sometimes it's for a fair reason.

You never know who's watching that could help you rise in your career.

Warrell pointed out, "While it may be easy to succumb to resentment or resignation and mentally check out of your job, doing so not only undermines your own integrity but it can put you at risk of being branded as whiner, a slacker, or both." You're not doing yourself any favors by retaliating in that way.

Warrell suggested, "If you’re doing the best job you can do, keep your head held high and don’t give him the satisfaction of pushing you about.

Rather ask questions, seek to understand, and work to defuse a difficult situation instead of cowering or responding in anger." Either your boss has a valid point and their answers will help clarify that, or they might see the error in their harshness with your well pointed questions.

While some bosses might just be downright crazy, most of the time you get snapped at pushed too hard because of forces that are outside of your control.

Career coach Ashley Stahl at career development site The Muse explained, "In some of those cases, her reaction will be warranted, but more often than not, her behavior will be the side effect of something else in her life.

While there are things that make your boss turn on you, there are also things that they look at in a favorable light.

Gather intel on what that is and then use it to influence their behavior.

Business writer Margie Warrell at Forbes recommended, "If you know you have a boss who’s disorganized, then help him to be on top of things rather than whining about his lack of organizational skills.

If you know your boss is often late to meetings, offer to kick off the next meeting for him.

At least then you'll know it's not for a good reason.