“In 1967, when my parents break all the rules and marry against laws that say they can’t, they say that an individual should not be bound to the wishes of their family, race, state, or country.

Helen Hunt Jackson’s novel "Ramona" is a case in point.

In it, a woman named Señora Moreno objects to her adoptive daughter Ramona’s impending marriage to a Temecula man named Alessandro.

When slavery of blacks became institutionalized in the U.

S., however, anti-miscegenation laws surfaced in various states that barred such unions, thereby stigmatizing them.

for white people were part of another world, distant strangers who ruled our lives and were better left alone,” Cassie thinks.

“When they entered our lives, they were to be treated courteously, but with aloofness, and sent away as quickly as possible.” To boot, by this time, the fight for civil rights had grown very integrated.Whites and blacks often fought for racial justice side-by-side, allowing interracial romance to bloom.When protagonist Cassie Logan’s cousin visits from the North to announce that he’s taken a white wife, the entire Logan family is aghast.“Cousin Bud had separated himself from the rest of us…The raping of African-American women by plantation owners and other powerful whites during this period have cast an ugly shadow on relationships between black women and white men.