I picked up my 2nd at a flea market yesterday was just wondering how to figure out what year it was built and where.

These amps caught on straight away, and in 1948 Fender released the Champ, which became the most popular amplifier they built.

The stage was set for rock'n'roll, and most guitarists from the early days of rock used Fener amps, whether they played a Fender guitar or not: Scotty Moore (Elvis) had a 1952 Deluxe; Cliff Gallup (Gene Vincent) also had a Deluxe; Buddy Holly had a TV-front Pro and a Bassman combo; and Chuck Berry is thought to have used a Bassman in the Fifties (pics and info are sketchy, but later on Berry would use a Fender Pro, and then go on to demand two Dual Showman Fenders as his main amp at gigs - a setup he kept for over 30 years!

The Fender musical revolution started before the birth of rock music, just after the end of WW2.

Since his early teens Leo Fender had an interest in electronics, and when he grew up, Leo made a career for himself fixing and building PA systems for musicians, opening his own shop in California.

Fender guitar amps have been a constant in rock music, featuring legendary clean tones, lush spring reverbs and, in the case of the newest solid-state models, some of the best modeling and built-in digital effects available today. After all, with so many different models, it may get a bit complicated...

so let's go back a bit to have a look at the history of Fender amps, at some famous users, and find out which are the best Fender amps you can find today!

Fender "JV" guitars were only made from 1982 to 1984.

On early Fender JV models, you will also find "MADE IN JAPAN" written very small under the Fender spaghetti logo on the headstock of the guitar.

They follow the same serial numbering patterns as the Fender MIJ models.

Please refer to the chart I have provided below in order to pinpoint the exact year your guitar was manufactured...

The spring reverb and tremolo effect will also be pretty much the same on the amps that feature those effects - and they're the standard by which those effects are judged on other amps (and fx pedals.) The most noticeable differences between those amps will be ones which are pretty much obvious when comparing any kind of valve amp, so they remain true with vintage Fender models, as expected: smaller, low-wattage amps will give you a great crunchy tone when they break-up, with the volume cranked up; louder amps will keep cleaner at louder volumes; and amps with bigger speakers will sound fuller than the ones which have smaller speakers.